The

Lord’s

Prayer

Artwork

Project

Artists from the congregation have created beautiful paintings inspired by the phrases of the Lord’s Prayer, our focus for worship during the summer of 2020. These works will be unveiled and displayed in the Narthex through the month of September. 

Our Father which art in heaven,

Hallowed be thy name.

Thy kingdom come,

Thy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven.

Give us this day our daily bread.

And forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors.

And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil:

For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, for ever. Amen.

A Word from the Artist

 

“My inspiration for this painting, depicting ‘Hallowed Be Thy Name’ first evolved with a vision of hands reaching for the heavens. I then decided a background that would best represent God's creation should be hills, rivers, mountains, and sky.  This painting represents the declaration that God's name is Holy, and that He is worthy of praise for His immeasurable worth.

-Barbara Gilley

“Hallowed Be Thy Name”

by Barbara Gilley

A Word from the Artist

 

"I am in awe of God's nearness when I look at huge, billowing clouds. I feel humbled by the magnitude of God's Kingdom. My prayer is that the viewer of my painting will become still and feel God's Presence."

-Muriel Fawcett

"Thy Kingdom Come"

by Muriel Fawcett

"Thy Will Be Done"

by Cathy Bradley

A Word from the Artist

 

"The color purple symbolized faith, patience and trust. Gold symbolizes spirituality and complete understanding. We trust God to hold us in his hands always. He asks us to pray, to have patience for answers and trust that He knows what is best for us all. God implores us to raise our hearts and hands in faithful surrender, and pray for and proclaim 'Thy Will Be Done.'"

-Cathy Bradley

“Give Us This Day Our Daily Bread”

by Janice Carrison

A Word from the Artist

 

The circle represents our world with the different cultural hands offering not just bread, but other needs also, merging into the orchid to represent a blended world where we all have the same needs, emotional, physical, mental and spiritual! Just as Mother Earth depends on God for her needs, Jesus instructs us to have faith in God for all our needs for all mankind. As a professional gardener and landscaper, I’ve often wondered as I’m pruning the dead out of a shrub, how is this done in nature with- out a human gardener? How do the dead branches get removed from a shrub in the wild, or a dead branch on a tree? Then I realize God does have a plan. The dead branches provide sticks for the bird’s nest or an animal goes into the shrub and breaks off branches to clear the way for its bed, or a storm comes in and blows the branch off the tree, or a fire reclaims the earth only to be reborn again. Even the needs of a simple shrub are cared for by God. Amazing!

-Janice Carrison

“Forgive Us Our Trespasses”

by Ann Snell

A Word from the Artist

 

The child seen trespassing is a symbol of us all, as we can trespass literally, or commit the sin of moral trespass against others or against the laws of God.
The threatening sky represents all the storms that our trespassing causes, but the awesome beauty of the sun’s rays piercing the storm with light is just like our merciful Father forgiving us and also enabling us to forgive others. Anyone who has ever seen such a glorious skyscape and all the other priceless scenes of nature has seen the work of God. The child in the painting may not even know he is trespassing. God gave His son so that we can all be forgiven; all the big things and all the little things.

-Ann Snell

“Lead Us Not Into Temptation”

​by Judy Smigiel

A Word from the Artist

 

The phrase “Lead us not into temptation” brought to mind the metaphorical
story of Adam and Eve which illustrates the consequences of giving in to temptation when something is known to be wrong, or is contradictory to what God would have us do - a good vs. evil battle. My 3-D mixed media painting depicts the Biblical garden of Eden with the tree of knowledge of good and evil, the fruit of which Adam and Eve were forbidden to eat. I choose to think of the
serpent as that voice in our heads convincing us to succumb to the temptation
at hand. Any object or action can be substituted for the tempting apple but the
lesson is the same -- We know we should do the righteous and honorable thing
when tempted, but human nature many times gives in to temptation, causing
us and others to ultimately suffer the consequences of our actions.

-Judy Smigiel

WORSHIP

Sunday Morning Services

9:00 and 10:15 

CONTACT

 865-458-1516

130 Chota Center

Loudon, TN 37774

mail@tellicochurch.org 

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